Harvard Study: Apple Slows Down Older iPhones To Keep Millions Buying New Models

17

(The Last American Vagabond) Time and time again I’ve heard people complain about their iPhones or Mac laptops getting slower and slower, forcing them to purchase entirely new products. However, many people who have experienced this technological lull also noticed that the deterioration of their Apple products coincided with the launch of Apple’s new products.

To be honest, if Apple was doing this, it would be a pretty smart business move. They launch new products periodically, and all of them are really just slightly fancier versions of their older models. People don’t often need these products, they simply want them. They only become a “need” when their older models break or malfunction.

Personally, I love these products! But every 2-4 years, my iPhones all of a sudden malfunction and my MacBook will randomly get slower. The question is: Are these products simply malfunctioning thanks to “old age” and natural wear and tear, or are they breaking because Apple purposefully slows down its older models prior to releasing new ones?

Study Suggests That Apple Deliberately Sabotages Old Products

A study performed by student Laura Trucco at Harvard University aimed at determining whether or not there was any truth behind the claims that Apple sabotages its own products prior to releasing new models.

The study reviewed worldwide searches for “iPhone slow” and discovered that this particular phrase was searched for significantly more whenever a new iPhone was about to be launched. Trucco then compared those results to the findings of other searches for Apple’s competitors’ phones, such as “Samsung Galaxy slow,” and found that the phrase was not searched for more around the time that a new Samsung phone model was released.

As you can see, the number of Google searches for “iPhone slow” spiked every time a new phone model was launched and made available to the public:

You can then review the number of searches for “Samsung Galaxy slow” in comparison to the release dates for their new phone models:

This isn’t the first time anyone has publicly discussed these claims, suggesting that Apple does in fact sabotage its old products prior to releasing new ones. For example, Catherine Rampell of the New York Times suggested that Apple could design its new operating systems so that they only properly work on their newer devices.

Rampell even stated that her own iPhone 4 got slower when she downloaded the new operating system at the time, and that the only solution to fix it would be to purchase the newer version of the iPhone.

Rampell explained, “When major innovations remain out of reach, and degrading durability threatens to tick off loyal customers, companies like Apple can still take a cue from the fashion industry.”

Apple doesn’t necessarily need to make its products more advanced in regard to technology in the same way that many other tech companies need to. Apple can simply make slight technological advancements in addition to more appealing aesthetic changes and still convince customers that they need to buy their newest products, even if they operate extremely similarly.

Even if their older models are still functioning, they continue to perpetuate this consumer mindset that “we need to follow the latest trends,” similar to the fashion industry. It’s largely about aesthetics.

Final Thoughts

It’s important to keep in mind that, although Apple could be purposefully slowing down older models in order to convince you to purchase their newer ones, this is not a hard fact. Smartphones and laptops naturally slow down over time, especially when you’re updating your software and apps constantly as well as filling them steadily with more digital debris.

So, although your phones may seem slower after updating them, this may not actually be proof of this “conspiracy theory.” Plus, if Apple is actually sabotaging their own products, is there anything really “wrong” with that? They’re a business, and ultimately their number one goal is to profit. By selling you more phones, they will obviously make more money, which is their end goal anyways. Sure, it may seem unethical to the consumer, but it’s not necessarily “wrong.”

Either way, there’s no way of knowing 100% whether or not Apple purposefully slows down its products prior to launching its new ones. However, if you do notice that your phone or laptop is slow and you need a new one, do not just throw them out. Either give them or sell them to someone who could actually use it, return it to Apple so they can reuse it for parts, or get it fixed so you don’t need to purchase an entirely new product.

These electronics are by no means “good for the environment,” there are parts that need to be mined for and they require a lot of energy to produce. When you can prevent having to purchase something new or save something from ending up in a landfill, do it.

 


Anonymous recommends: Click Here To Surf & Download Anonymously, Protect Yourself From Any Hackers Or Spy Agencies And Get Around Censorship Filters

Click here to follow us on steemit.com, the decentralized social media platform with no censorship and get paid for your posts, likes and comments!

Do you like our independent & investigative news? Then please check these two settings on Facebook to guarantee you don't miss our posts:

anonymous news feed and notifications

 
SHARE

17 COMMENTS

  1. Isn’t it possible that people are looking for an excuse to buy the next iFad and search for like minded delusionals?
    It would be interesting to see the searches performed on Amazon Prime Day or Black Friday.
    Can’t stand Apple. So I’m not a fanboy making excuses.

  2. “Plus, if Apple is actually sabotaging their own products, is there anything really “wrong” with that?…Sure, it may seem unethical to the consumer, but it’s not necessarily “wrong.” ” – YES it is wrong you dimwit of a writer. It is called DEFRAUDING, SWINDLING, CHEATING. Just like If your car dealership fidgeted with your car during maintenance every year just before the launch of a new model to make your car perform worse or break faster in an effort to convince you to buy a new car. Unfortunately many mechanics do this to their customers as most of us are well aware. So YES it is obviously very wrong.

  3. ” They’re a business, and ultimately their number one goal is to profit. By selling you more phones, they will obviously make more money, which is their end goal anyways. Sure, it may seem unethical to the consumer, but it’s not necessarily “wrong.” ”

    You just touched on an important fundamental paradox in the current system – why are “unethical” and “wrong” considered different things?

  4. I have to wonder if there are impacts to benchmark scores after each new iOS update.
    If you took an iPhone 4 and installed it’s original OS, ran a test, then updated to each subsequent version of iOS… would we see a slowdown?

  5. Highly irresponsible article.

    This is merely correlation between a release date and a subjective variable. While someone with no scientific knowledge could read into this and think it’s malicious, it’s HIGHLY irresponsible to write an article suggesting Apple does this on purpose. The authors here are riling up people on pseudoscience claims that are based on circumstantial evidence at best.

    • Scientific facts? Seriously? What about the statistics? And since when as responsibility been a prerequisit for “news”?

      I will give you this..author seems to think that since this alleged fraud was committed in the interest of profit, its ok. I think this reflects an attitude prevailing in modern culture..and its a departure as well as abondonement of ethical business standards once regarded as foundational in America.

  6. People buy “durable” products such as autos and iPhones, and pay good money for them, with the expectation that they will last for a number of years. I get that slower processors in older phones may have a difficult time running subsequent operating system releases as the years pass, due to their increasing complexity, but to deliberately slow them down is simply unethical, i.e. WRONG. Making money is a logical and necessary goal for all companies, but it’s expected that the pursuit of that goal is done ethically, and it’s the responsibility of our government to ensure that it’s done that way.

  7. ” Plus, if Apple is actually sabotaging their own products, is there anything really “wrong” with that? They’re a business, and ultimately their number one goal is to profit. By selling you more phones, they will obviously make more money, which is their end goal anyways. Sure, it may seem unethical to the consumer, but it’s not necessarily “wrong”. ”
    The author cannot be this blindly fucking stupid.
    In what possible way would it Not be wrong to literally sabotage someone’s personal property.

  8. So u think it not ethnically wrong to sabotage a product that we purchased already so we have to go out and buy new phones? Because I think that’s bullshit.

  9. All phone companies do it. Don’t be fooled Samsung users. It’s called basic marketing to make more money. And this is why they’re worth millions and you’re all sitting at home writing your stupid comments behind a computer screen.

  10. Could be with the new phone comes the new software update. Making some of the older phones slow for awhile also while they are updating internally.

  11. Welcome to the modern morally vacant person. You’ll see more and more of them in the future.
    “Plus, if Apple is actually sabotaging their own products, is there anything really “wrong” with that?”
    If you can just cheat and lie to get what you want, and win, aren’t you still winning?
    In the world Kanye, the Kardashians and the rest, this is the new norm.

  12. If they really want to know they could just put it on the bench and test it. This reeks of the smear campaigns that Apple Insider has traced to Seoul in the past. Using search phrases is ridiculous, anyway, especially since new releases with iPhone and iOS always correlate. And Samsung and Android rarely do.

    Why not research “Android slow”? That would be a more accurate phrase for somebody who just updated their Android and found issues.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here