The FBI Dropped The Child Porn Case In Order To Protect The TOR Exploit

Surveillance becomes so cheap and hacking becomes cheaper

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The United States government is dismissing a case against a criminal who was caught accessing a child porn website because the United States Department of Justice does not want the world to know how they were able to catch that paedophile.

The United States versus Jay Michaud is the official title of the case. The case, which was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, used a unique method the Network Investigative Technique to lure in Jay Michaud.

According to Ars Technica, more than a hundred people who are now under investigation were caught by the agency and were involved in the Playpen child pornography incident. The hidden website is only accessible via The Onion Router because it is based on the deep web.

The Onion Router or TOR allows its users to use the Internet with anonymity, it filters you though a lot of other servers that makes its users difficult to trace.

However, the agency took control of the pedophilia website, which was not known by the child porn loving community in the deep web. The FBI ran the dirty website for days because they wanted to catch who posted, shared and visited the website.

The FBI initially had problems in identifying people involved with Playpen and because of the anonymity TOR provides, their Internet Protocol address along with their physical addresses were impossible to trace. Due to this difficulty, the FBI got the permission from the court and went on a hacking spree where it was able to get visitors’ IP addresses.

PornThe court and the agency are willing to provide the methods and technology it used to identify Michaud and others but they fear that if the techniques that were used to identify these paedophiles come to light, then the cybercriminals will come up with a way to guard against it.

Annette Hayes, a prosecutor for this case, says actions must be taken to either disclosure or classify the information arguing that making the information public was not an option, at least for now.

“Dismissal without prejudice leaves open the possibility that the government could bring new charges,” says Annette Hayes in the court filing. “Should there come a time within the statute of limitations when and the government be in a position to provide the requested discovery.”

In the winters of last year, certain government bodies were given authorization and exclusive rights for hacking other people and organizations. This also allowed magistrates to issue special warrants on people who were using systems to cover their online existence. This exclusivity gave the FBI the authority to hack others and extract their information.


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